Tuesday, 21 January 2014

Understanding the Four Stages of Learning

Do you remember learning to ride a bike? Was it difficult? Did you think you’d never be able to do it? Now think back to before you started to learn to ride a bike. Did it look like it was going to be easy? Once you started to learn, did you have to concentrate hard just to stay upright? If you get on a bike now do you just ride off without even thinking about it? That’s the four stages of learning.

Learning a new task will often take us through the four stages of learning. We might well begin with “unconscious incompetent” where we can’t do the task but think it’s going to be easy to do. We may then very quickly become “conscious incompetent” where we can’t do the task and know it. From there, if we persevere and continue to learn, we become “conscious competent” where we can do the task, but we have to think carefully about each move. Eventually, with enough practice, we become “unconscious competent” where we can do the task without thinking about it. Much like riding a bike.


Take a look at our Train the Trainer courses if you want to learn about how the four stages of learning can affect you in the training room.

Visit the Gary Bedingfield Training website at www.garybedingfield.co.uk