Monday, 23 April 2012

Dealing with Challenging Behaviour

A 1 day training course designed for trainers and staff working in the health and social care sectors who might be faced with behaviour issues from service users.


In the health and social care sectors you can encounter a wide variety of behaviour which can significantly affect the quality of the lives of those involved. Our Dealing with Challenging Behaviour course has been designed to help you have a better understanding of challenging behaviour and to develop ways to deal with it. You will become familiar with different types of challenging behaviour, learn to identify some of the factors that cause this behaviour and identify likely trigger points in service users.

The course consists of 7 sessions:

Session 1 Identifying Types of Challenging Behaviour
Session 2 The Impact of Challenging Behaviour
Session 3 Knowing the Potential Causes of Challenging Behaviour
Session 4 Recognising Early Warning Signs
Session 5 Remaining in Control
Session 6 Understanding Restraint
Session 7 Strategies to Encourage Positive Behaviour

Here is a sample activity from our Dealing with Challenging Behaviour course:


Session 1 - Identifying Types of Challenging Behaviour


Acts of challenging behaviour can be categorised as follows:

  • Non-compliance
  • Physical
  • Verbal
  • Self-harming
  • Behaviour directed at property
  • Sexualised

Thinking about the service users you or your staff work with, what acts of challenging behaviour might be witnessed? What category do these acts fall in to?


Dealing with Challenging Behaviour is a 1 day course delivered at your premises. It is available throughout the UK with costs starting from just £350 for a group of 8.

If you would like to book this course or require more details please visit our webiste at  www.garybedingfield.co.uk


“I first contacted Gary Bedingfield Training Services in the hopes of finding a training session that would meet some of our employee training requirements. I had previously contacted several other training facilities who were unable to help.
Within minutes of our conversation Gary was able to establish the exact training course for us. We found our training experiences with Gary Bedingfield Training Services to be excellent. Not only was the session delivered on-site, but it was also designed specifically to meet our needs all at a very competitive rate. We would have no hesitation in using Gary’s services in the future and would highly recommend his services.”
June Petrie
Service & Quality Manager
Carewatch (Grampian)


Saturday, 21 April 2012

Writing Successful Spec Letters


Because at least 75% of jobs are never advertised the speculative approach (contacting employers who are not currently advertising vacancies) is a very important part of looking for employment.

A Hook

The best approach to use is to try to find a reason why you are contacting the organisation. This is called a “hook” and gives added value and purpose to your enquiry. When looking for something to use as a hook, you might consider:

• Companies that are opening new premises
• Companies that have won a new contract
• Companies that are launching a new product or service
• Companies that have recently been featured in national/local newspapers or on TV

The first paragraph of your letter should answer 4 questions – why you want to work for them, what you’re looking for, what you’re offering and why they should care.

Here is an example of an opening paragraph you could use:

Having recently read about the impressive new warehouse facility you are opening in Glasgow, I am writing to outline my extensive experience as a Dispatch Assistant. I believe I possess the skills and expertise necessary to make a significant contribution to your organisation.

No Hook

If you are unable to find a suitable hook, then you can use the following approach:

Having carefully researched your business and its position within the market, I am writing to outline my extensive experience as a Dispatch Assistant. I believe I possess the skills and expertise necessary to make a significant contribution to your organisation.

Or:

Having recently completed my SVQ Level 2 in Childcare, I believe I possess the skills and experience necessary to make a significant contribution to your organisation.

Or:

Are you looking for a valuable combination of honesty, reliability and hard work? Then my work background will definitely interest you.

Here is a complete spec letter using a hook:




You can learn more about our writing spec letters on our Speculative Letters That Work course or on our Let's Get That Job! course.